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Class66 / JT42CWR "Shed" Diesel Freight Locomotive

British class 66 has become one of the most successfull diesel locomotive types in Europe. The locomotive is based on the proven American robust locomotive technology (roughly the SD70 construction) heavily adapted to the European requirements. Hundreds of this type earn income to their owners every day year round. A successor candidate class 66 EU has a number of things further improves, among these one that is strikingly poor for the class 66: the crew conditions.

Transpetrol class66
Picture above: a HGK JT42CWR number DE672 in Ulm Germany. This locomotive is operated by Transpetrol. Picture by Ilkka Siissalo 2007.

-- Click any picture to see a larger version of it! --

* Why the Class 66 has become so popular * Technical specifications * After 66 * Class 66 competition * Next Class Numbers in Use... *

Roster pictures by Operator
Aggregate (UK) : Class 59 number 59005 *
Cargonet (Norway, Sweden) : 402 * 403 *
406 *
EWS (DB Schenker) : 009 * 077 * 100 * 140 * 142 * 176 * 185 * 187 * 196 * 246 *
Freightliner (UK) : 407 * 414 * 502 * 516 * 522 * 572 * 608 *
Metronet/GBRF (UK) : 714 * 718 * 722 *
Transpetrol (Germany) : DE672 *


Created for 4rail.net by John McKey, Ilkka Siissalo and Andreas Ehnberg. Pictures by Stanislav Voronin, Ilkka Siissalo, Hannu Peltola, Andreas Ehnberg and John McKey.

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Vectron of Siemens AG is one of the newest modular locomotive platforms for the European market. A locomotive packed full with high tech features and
great modularity.


JT42CWR/Class66 is one of the most common diesel locomotive types in Europe. Look at the Class 66 Page to find out more about the success.

el18 number 2252 in Oslo, Norway
LOK2000 locos were one of the first truly common European work horses for the electric traction.

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  Class 66 / JT42CWR General Info
Freightliner Class 66 number 66414

Class66 is one of the most successfull diesel locomotive types in Europe. The locomotive is based on the proven American robust locomotive technology (roughly an SD70 construction) adapted to European requirements. Hundreds of this type earn income to their owners every day year round. A possible successor (no orders have been reported yet) class 66 EU has a number of things further improves, among these one that is strikingly poor for the class 66: the crew conditions.
   
The JT42CWS/JT42CWSM/class66 has become a symbol to diesel success in Europe, as many of the open access operators operate the type. The diesel locomotive can operate independently of dozens of European electric companies and 4 main electricity distribution form standards, as long as the 1435 mm (4' 8,5") gauge applies, which is most of the Western Europe. Also the British traditional small loading gauge used makes the use possible just about anywhere.
     
Amazingly, in just 10 years this locomotive has been taken into use in at least 15 European nations for tens of operators! As an American design made to cross the mountains, to be used almost continuously and survive with minimal maintenance this locomotive is at home both in the rough winter conditions in Nordic countries and in summers heat in southern France.


 Why the class 66 is popular
What is special about class 66? The class 66 has become immensely popular among the operators. We can pinpoint at least 3 reasons for this success:

  1. Interoperability in Europe. The manufacturer EMD has been carefull in making sure thet the JT42CWR is certified for large majority of the European Union countries and countries around them. A few member countries had chosen not to certify the locomotive, which will lead to interesting situations, once the rule that if a rolling stock is certified in one EU member country, it should in general be allowed to operate in all others (some restrictions like train control systems still apply) comes into effect.  
  2. Critical volume. Once the locomotive is common enough that dozens of operators own it, you are almost guaranteed to have the aftersale market, be able to lease and lend locomotives, and be able to acquire services and repairs easily.  
  3. Successfull design. Although the crews have reported about the poor spartan cabin, the locomotive is otherwise very durable and made to last. The capacity is just high enough to pull a medium sized freight train (for Europe) and while the loading gauge is "obsolete" (the smallest in Europe, that is the older British loading gauge), that means too that the size is not the issue anywhere.    
 Technical details
-> Builder: Electro-Motive Diesel @ Ontario Canada, distribution EMD Europe GbmB
-> Type: JT42CWR /  JT42CWRM / original classification was the British class 66, hence the common nickname for this durable locomotive.    
-> Usage: Medium heavy freight road locomotive.  

 
-> Production dates: 1998 to current. Competition is getting tougher with calsses 67, 70, Euro3000, ...  
-> Numbers built: 700+ currently in production use + some orders 
-> Gauge: 1435 mm (4' 8.5" ft) , could be easily adapted to 1520/1524 mm gauge (5 ft) or other broad gauge.
   
-> Users: Numerous European operators and/or owners including ACTS Nederland BV, Aggregate, CargoNet of Scandinavia, DLC Railway, ECR (Euro Cargo rail), EWS, Fastline Freight (Alco Leasing), FirstGBRf (Porterbook Leasing), Freightliner UK, HGK, MRCS (Mitsui Rail Capital Europe), Rail4Chem Benelux, Railion (owner of EWS), Rurtalbahn, TGOJ Trafik, Transpetrol (owner HGK), Veolia Transport, ... 
-> Seen: Most of the open access European 1435 mm rail network.  Numerous cross border operations.
-> Certified for operation in: Belgium, Czech Republic, Denmark, France, Germany, Great Britain, France, Luxembourg, Netherlands, Norway, Poland, Slovak republic and Sweden. 
-> Operators outside Europe: Egyptian National Railways  
   
-> Energy Source: Diesel fuel   
-> Engine: EMD 12N-710G38-EC / 12N-710G3B-T2 (later (current production model) compatible with EU Stage 3A Exhaust Emission regulations). Engine is turbocharged and features fuel injection for best possible performance.   
-> Power output: 2420 kW (3245 Hp), 2268 kW traction output 
-> Transmission: Diesel electric 

-> Traction generator: AR8/CA6, 18 kW ?Super? auxiliary generator     
-> Traction motors:  six D43TRC traction motors on axles
-> Tractive Effort: 409 kN start (very good!) / 260 kN at 26 km/h
-> Braking system: Westinghouse PBL air brake system, WLNA type direct drive air compressor  
-> Braking effort on traction motors (dynamic braking): -  
-> Wheel arrangement:  Co'Co'  
-> Bogies: optional HTCR-E radial bogies for reduced track and wheel wear (steerable trucks). Higher than normal adhesion. 

-> Electronics: Advanced EM2000 computer to reduce in modules and components and improve performance, even at the lower speeds. Accessible for Laptop via USB for system diagnostics and program maintenance. Optional Intellitrain remote monitoring and GPS.  

-> Servicing period: 180 day maintenance interval, 1,6 million km for HTCR bogies, 20 year engine overhaul period.

-> Services from the manufacturer: Full maintenance, remote monitoring.

-> Crash resistance: 300 kN collision beam at the front of the cab(s). Cab structure penetration resistant up to 900 G:s! High impact resistant windsreens. 

-> For the train personnel: "Quiet" cab (the earlier versions were very noisy and uncomfortable and the train personnel hated them), heating and airconditioning.


-> Maximum operational speed where possible:  120 km/h (75 mph)   
-> Multiple unit operation capability: Yes

-> Length: 20,1 meters   
-> Heigth:  3,9 m 
-> Width:  2,65 m (within the British loading gauge = narrower than normal ~3 meters used in several countries in Europe)
-> Fuel capacity: 6400 liters
-> Lube oil capacity: 625 liters      
-> Weight: 129,6 metric tonnes   
-> Axle weight max: 



After Class 66
with the success of JT42 the interest to share the market has picked up. General Electric, the dominant locomotive manufacturer is the U.S. has brought to the market it's Class 70 locos, which are more powerful that the Class66s. Also the GE has adressed the most obvious lack for the Class 66: poor working conditions. GE is known in the U.S. for providing relatively quiet work environment for the engineers. But so does the competition in Europe. Euro3000 is one example of the high quality competition, as are the Eurorunners by Siemens and Traxx diesels by the Bombardier, plus a huge diesel product line of Vossloh. Somehow you get the idea, that the only surviving strength for the Class 66 new sales might be it's capability to operate on the backward loading gauge, the competition can't match. It remains to be seen if this is enough to attract new customers, or will the last class 66 locomotive built in 2008 and shipped to use in Europe in 2011 also be the last of it's kind.

Class 66 of Transpetrol at Ulm, Germany
CargoNet Class 66 in Norway
EWS class66 number 187 in London, U.K.
Freightliner Class 66 number 66502
 
   

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The Competition

  Class 66 Competitors
Freightliner class 70 70001 closeup, U.K

Picture: Freightliner Class 70 is a modern General Electric built locomotive for the European diesel market. More powerful than the class 66 it can haul longer / faster trains when necessary. The initial batch of 30 locos is currently being delivered to Freightliner in United Kingdom.

Picture by Nick Slocombe.

 

   

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Aggregate

  Class 59 of Aggregate
Calss 66 of Aggregate

  Aggregate Class 59 diesel number 59005 looking very much like the following class 66 is seen all of the sudden through the Heathrow express window. Sorry about the picture quality, no better picture exists for the moment. Picture by John McKey.

This locomotive is one of the batch of five class 59 locos supplied to Foster Yeoman by General Motors-EMD from their La Grange plant in the USA. The first four locos arrived in the U.K. in January 1985. They were numbered 59001-59004. A fifth loco, 59005 followed in May 1989. These locomotives were a great success.

The series of class 59 locomotives also became an example how easily things progress forward once you first create dependable and standardized motive power and operating environment:

  • ARC received four class 59s in October 1990 numbered 59101-59104.
  • Foster Yeoman and ARC, though competitors merged their rail operations in in 1993 as Mendip Rail.
  • A third operator called National Power bought one class 59 in January 1994, no. 59201 and five more nos,59202-59206 in 1995.
  • In April 1998 EWS bought the National Power rail operations and ownership of 59201-59206. Mendip Rail maintains the EWS (now DB Schencher) class 59 fleet.
  • Unit 59003 was sent to Europe in a joint venture by Foster Yeoman/DB Cargo.
  • This agreement ceased in 1999 and 59003 was taken over by Heavy Haul Power International.
  • Foster Yeoman joined up with Aggregate Industries in 2006. Loco 59001 was repainted into a new Aggregates Industries Limited paint scheme in 2008 as was 59005. 59005 is the loco featured in the picture. It carries the name Kenneth J. Painter. (TB)

 

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CargoNet (now NSB)

  Class 66 number 402 used by CargoNet
CargoNet Class 66 in Norway

Picture: The CargoNet clas66 number 402 seen hauling container train in the northern mountain area of Norway.

Picture by Ilkka Siissalo.

 

  - - - Click any picture to see a larger version of it! - - -

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  Class 66 number 403 used by CargoNet
Class 66 in Norway

Picture: The CargoNet clas66's are providing the motive power for a north-south container train in 2009 in Norway. As far as we have learned the use for these locos is getting lesser and the cooperation Green Cargo - NSB was sold to NSB creating again an aerial exclusive NSB operation for Norway. Excluding certain Green Cargo hauled freight trains.

Picture by Ilkka Siissalo.

 

CargoNet Class 66 in Norway Another picture of the unit 403 in Bodö, Norway.

Picture by Ilkka Siissalo.
CargoNet Class 66 in Norway Here you can almost feel that the unit is ready to start the train up the mountain side.

Picture by Ilkka Siissalo.

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  Class 66 number 406 used by CargoNet
CargoNet Class 66 in Norway

Picture: The CargoNet clas66 number 406 pulling a long freight at Saltdal (Salt Valley) in Norway.

Picture by Ilkka Siissalo.

 

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EWS (DB Schenker)

  Class 66 number 009 of EWS
EWS class66 number 009 in London, U.K.

Picture: The EWS JT42CW number 009 is pulling an empty cement train from St Pancras to Ketton.

Picture by Nick Slocombe.

 

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  Class 66 number 077 of EWS
EWS Class 66 number 077 at Restomel, U.K.

Picture: The EWS JT42CWR number 077 passing Restomel curve with a mixed freight.

Picture by Nick Slocombe.

 

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  Class 66 number 100 of EWS
EWS Class 66 in London, U.K.

Picture: The EWS JT42CWR number 100 with freight at Harringay Park, London, U.K.

Picture by Nick Slocombe.

 

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  Class 66 number 140 of EWS
EWS Class 66 in London, U.K.

Picture: The EWS JT42CWR number 140 with a boxed freight at Gospel Oaks, London, U.K.

Picture by Nick Slocombe.

 

  - - - Click any picture to see a larger version of it! - - -

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  Class 66 number 142 of EWS
EWS Class 66 in London, U.K.

Picture: The EWS Class 66 number 142 with a mixed freight at Crouch Hill, London, U.K.

Picture by Nick Slocombe.

 

  - - - Click any picture to see a larger version of it! - - -

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  Class 66 number 176 of EWS
EWS class66 number 176 at Crawen Arms, U.K.

Picture: The EWS JT42CW number 176 at Crewen Arms.

Picture by Nick Slocombe 2006.

 

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  Class 66 number 185 of EWS
EWS Class 66 number 185 at RLostwithiel, U.K.

Picture: Running much earlier than expected this is the 6G06 Goonbarrow to Fowey is approaching Lostwithiel in the aftermath of a cloudburst. The locomotive is class 66 number 185.

Picture by Nick Slocombe.

 

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  Class 66 number 187 of EWS
EWS class66 number 187 in London, U.K.

Picture: The EWS JT42CW number 187 is pulling a scrap train in London. Behind in the distance can be seen the London Eye.

Picture by Nick Slocombe.

 

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  Class 66 number 196 of EWS
EWS Class 66 in London, U.K.

Picture: The EWS Class 66 number 196 is seen with auto freight at Upper Holloway, London, U.K.

Picture by Nick Slocombe.

 

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  Class 66 number 246 of EWS
EWS class66 number 246 at London, U.K.

Picture: The EWS JT42CW number 246 is pulling a freight in London.

Picture by Nick Slocombe.

 

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Freightliner

  Class 66 number 407 of Freightliner
Freightliner class66 number 407 at London, U.K.

Picture: The Freightliner Class 66 number 407 with a container train in London.

Picture by Nick Slocombe.

 

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  Class 66 number 414 of Freightliner
Freightliner Class 66 number 66414

Picture: The Freightliner C66 number 414 with a container train at Kings Sutton.

Picture by Nick Slocombe.

 

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  Class 66 number 502 of Freightliner
Freightliner Class 66 number 66502

Picture: The Freightliner C66 number 502 with a train of containers at Banbury.

Picture by Nick Slocombe.

 

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  Class 66 number 516 of Freightliner
Freightliner Class66 number 516 at Old Lindsdale, U.K.

Picture: The Freightliner Class 66 shed number 516 with a train of containers at Old Lindsdale, U.K.

Picture by Nick Slocombe.

 

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  Class 66 number 522 of Freightliner
Freightliner Class 66 in London, U.K.

Picture: The Freightliner shed number 522 with a boxed train at Harringay Park, London, U.K.

Picture by Nick Slocombe.

 

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  Class 66 number 572 of Freightliner
Freightliner Class 66 number 572 at Denmark Hill, U.K.

Picture: The Freightliner Class 66 number 572 again with a train of containers passing Denmark Hill, U.K.

Picture by Nick Slocombe.

 

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  Class 66 number 608 of Freightliner
Freightliner class66 number 608 at Crawen Arms, U.K.

Picture: The Freightliner C66 number 608 with a scrap metal train at Crawen Arms.

Picture by Nick Slocombe 2006.

 

  - - - Click any picture to see a larger version of it! - - -

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Metronet / Gbrf

  Class 66 number 714 of Metronet
Gbrf class66 number 714 Whittlesey, U.K.

Picture: A GBRF operated class 66 locomotive number 714 at Whittlesey.

Picture by Nick Slocombe 2006.

 

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  Class 66 number 718 of Gbrf Metronet
Metronet / GBRF intermodal freight ast Kings Sutton, U.K.

Picture: A Metronet/GBRF operated class 66 locomotive number 718 at Kings Sutton, U.K.

Picture by Nick Slocombe 2010.

 

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  Class 66 number 722 of Gbrf Metronet
GBRF class66 number 722 at Old Lindsdale, U.K.

Picture: A Metronet/GBRF operated class 66 locomotive number 722 at Lindsdale, U.K.

Picture by Nick Slocombe 2006.

 

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Transpetrol

  Class 66 number De672 of Transpetrol
Class 66 of Transpetrol at Ulm, Germany

Picture: The Transpetrol operated Class 66 DE672 at Ulm station in Germany.

Picture by Ilkka Siissalo.

 

Class 66 of Transpetrol at Ulm, Germany  

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Next in Numbers After
Class 66

  Class 67
Wrexham & Schropshire class 67 number 012 adn ECR class67 number 023 with IC coaches at Banbury, U.K.

Picture:

in United Kingdom.

Picture by Nick Slocombe.

 

   

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© 4rail.net Railroad Reference 2004 - 2014   -   Created 4.5.2011 John McKey, Ilkka Siissalo and Nick Slocombe, Updated 7.2.2014 John McKey